Role of wastewater analyzes for data analysis

Sewage testing could play an important role in detecting COVID-19 as more communities sign up for programs. With the increased availability of home testing, fewer test results are being reported, and this is where wastewater monitoring can become an invaluable tool. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed its national wastewater monitoring system in September 2020, but launched it nationwide earlier this month. “It gives us a chance to know where the infections are coming from regionally. If we have areas, large housing areas on campus, where we’re seeing a big increase, we know we’ll have to think about how to change our response to that area,” Paula Mouser, associate professor of civil engineering and environment at the University. of New Hampshire, said. People infected with COVID-19, whether they have symptoms or not, release genetic material from the virus in their feces that can be detected in sewage. Samples are taken from a sewer and then sent to a partner agency for testing. “This type of data can give us an early warning sign of increasing transmission and has the potential to help us decide where to direct testing and other healthcare resources,” Patricia Tilley, director of public health services at the State Department of Health and Health. The University of New Hampshire has been testing its own samples independently since the summer of 2020. Their researchers have also shared their method with long-term care facilities and other wastewater treatment facilities in the state. PCR that goes beyond the typical nasal swab tests we perform. It uses a very specific quantification approach,” Mouser said. The Keene Department of Public Works began sewage testing in 2020 in partnership with Keene State College, but has since halted testing. public and for Keene State to communicate to its people that he was really here. It wasn’t just something that was happening elsewhere,” said Kurt Blomquist, director of public works for Keene. According to the CDC’s website, there are three facilities in New Hampshire currently reporting sewage monitoring data. at CDC.In all, 37 states are working on programs.**City-by-City: COVID-19 Case Data|Vaccination Data**–

Sewage testing could play an important role in detecting COVID-19 as more communities sign up for programs.

With the increased availability of home testing, fewer test results are being reported, and this is where wastewater monitoring can become an invaluable tool.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed its national wastewater monitoring system in September 2020, but launched it nationwide earlier this month.

“It gives us a chance to know where the infections are coming from regionally. If we have areas, large housing areas on campus, where we’re seeing a big increase, we know we’ll have to think about how to change our response to that area,” Paula Mouser, associate professor of civil engineering and environment at the University. of New Hampshire, said.

People infected with COVID-19, whether they have symptoms or not, shed genetic material from the virus in their stools that can be detected in sewage. Samples are taken from a sewer and then sent to a partner agency for testing.

“This type of data can give us an early warning sign of increasing transmission and has the potential to help us decide where to direct testing and other healthcare resources,” Patricia Tilley, director of public health services at the State Department of Health and Health. Human Services, said.

The University of New Hampshire has been testing its own samples independently since the summer of 2020. Their researchers have also shared their method with long-term care facilities and other wastewater treatment facilities in the state.

“It’s a type of PCR that goes beyond the typical nasal swab tests we do. It uses a very specific quantitation approach,” Mouser said.

The Keene Public Works Department began sewage testing in 2020 in partnership with Keene State College, but has since halted testing.

“It gave weight, I think, for us to use and communicate with the public and for Keene State to communicate with his people that he was really here. It wasn’t just something that was happening somewhere else” , said Kurt Blomquist, director of public works for Keene. .

According to the CDC’s website, three New Hampshire facilities currently report wastewater monitoring data to the CDC.

A total of 37 states are working on developing programs.

** City by city: Data on COVID-19 cases | Vaccination data **


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